Articles

Painting a picture of a full orbed biblical life, these articles seek to spur you on to "love and good deeds". The topics are various--stories from the past, practical advice on music, or teaching from a pastor's heart--but the goal is the same; encouraging a Christ honoring world and life view

William Tyndale: Father of the English Bible

The full book shelves that most Christians have today contain several copies of the Bible. Digital copies of the Bible in many different translations and dramatic readings of the biblical text can be easily found on many websites. But, this has not always been the case. At the beginning of the Reformation, during the early […]

Rallying Cries of the Reformation

It is appropriate for Christians to remember the significant heroes of the past. This is especially true for Protestants, since there have been so many great champions from the Reformation (1517-1658) who made a major impact upon the present day church—men such as: Theodore Beza, Martin Bucer, Heinrich Bullinger, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer, Oliver Cromwell, […]

Give Me Scotland, Or I Die! The Life and Ministry of John Knox

“A man with God on his side is always in the majority.” John Knox Introduction:  Jesus Christ instructed his disciples in the Great Commission to “Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…baptizing them…and teaching them.” (Matthew 28:18-20) Why, then, should we as modern day disciples of Jesus Christ who are keenly interested in obeying […]

Calvin’s Doctrine of the Church

By anyone’s measure John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion, especially the mature 1559 edition, is an historically significant Reformed treatise that has greatly shaped the ministerial practice of Protestant churches worldwide. In it Calvin extensively addresses the doctrine of the church (Book 4, Chapters 1-12). This lengthy section within Calvin’s Institutes, entitled “The True […]

Rev. Jonathan Edwards: America’s Greatest Evangelical Theologian

Written by Dr. Marcus J. Serven: Moving day, during the hot Summer of 1751, was a subdued experience for the family of America’s foremost theologian Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758). Reluctantly, he and his burgeoning family were relocating from their beloved home in Northampton, Massachusetts, to begin a new life and ministry amongst the Indians on the frontier. After […]

Time Line of Key Events In the Life of John Calvin (1509-1564)

John Calvin’s Early Years: Birth and Preparation (1509-1531). 1509 Born July 10, 1509 in Noyon, France (2nd of six children). 1513 John’s mother, Jeanne, dies and his Father remarries (exact dates are uncertain). 1521 On May 19th receives benefice from the altar of Gesine in the cathedral of Noyon. 1523 Sent by his Father in August to study at the University of Paris.

The Pilgrim Fathers: Thanking God for His Providential Care

The rigors of the first winter for the Mayflower Pilgrims are well-known to most students of American history (1620-1621). Nearly half of the original 104 settlers died during that intense season of sickness, suffering, and sadness. Yet, God providentially intervened in several remarkable ways throughout the following spring and summer by providing help in the midst of their infirmities.

Sword Fight: The Courageous Character of John Calvin

“What kind of man was John Calvin (1509-1564), the Reformer of Geneva? Many people have very strong opinions about him, but few have ever read anything he actually wrote, or heard any of the fascinating stories from his life. Consider this compelling event from December 12, 1547: Calvin’s bold entry into the Council of the Two Hundred during the midst of a deadly sword fight! “

A Letter to a Grieving Father

John Calvin (1509-1564) is best known as a distinguished theologian and leading Protestant Reformer. However, it must be remembered that he functioned first and foremost as a pastor to the congregation of believers at Geneva for 25 years, and at Strasbourg for a brief interlude of 3 years.

Father of the Protestant Reformation

Following the great spiritual conflict at the imperial diet at Worms between Martin Luther and his accusers (1521), the Roman Catholic Church issued a Papal Bull for Luther’s excommunication. Not only was Luther’s soul threatened, but also his physical life. . .

But I Can’t Sing! Tips for a New Psalm Singer

Most people think they can’t sing because long, long ago, someone told them, “Sing a little quieter Johnny!” Subsequently that child grew up thinking he couldn’t sing–and he never sought to remedy the situation. However if the person merely exerted the smallest consistent effort, he would be amazed at the progress . . .